The
Perkins

Together we can save lives.

Since its inception in 1998, the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research has made significant discoveries into the diseases that plague our families, in particular heart disease, diabetes, cancer and rare genetic diseases. With over 270 researchers, scientists and doctors housed in two state-of-the-art research facilities, the Perkins creates a culture of innovation and collaboration. Teams dedicated to finding answers to defeat women’s cancers are funded from the Walk for Women’s Cancer each year.

This is the impact you’re having by participating in the Walk for Women’s Cancer in 2022:

You’re supporting the work of Associate Professor Pilar Blancafort

In the last year, Pilar made a global discovery of a gene that protects certain breast cancer cells from responding to treatment. Now that she knows what it is, she can work on ways of switching it off! This discovery will change the way we look at treating aggressive cancers and hopefully improve outcomes for patients. 

Pilar’s lab was also responsible for the honeybee venom discovery that made international headlines last year. It was discovered that the venom rapidly destroyed triple-negative breast cancer – some of the hardest to treat aggressive cancer cells.

You’re backing deeper investigation into bee venom

Funds from the Walk are also being directed into further investigation into melittin – the protein found in honeybee venom. In the lab, bee venom has been discovered to kill breast cancer cells. There’s so much more to learn about this incredible breakthrough and you’re helping us discovery more. 

You’re funding brilliant minds

With less than 10% of national grants successfully funded, talented researchers are missing out. The Walk for Women’s Cancer Gift was established in 2021 as an annual award to support women’s cancer researchers. This award will help to drive more ground-breaking discoveries and will be awarded in early 2022.  We’ll let you know whose won it and what they intend to do with it soon.